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Ek Pyaali Jannat  (A cup of paradise)

04:04 pm: uzairm
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tokillamockinggirl:

the teachers at my high school do this to the graffiti in the bathrooms and i literally cant

brilliant.

tokillamockinggirl:

the teachers at my high school do this to the graffiti in the bathrooms and i literally cant

brilliant.

(via halleluyang)

06:48 am: uzairm226,113 notes
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thenoobyorker:

Isn’t that the truth.

thenoobyorker:

Isn’t that the truth.

(Source: genericlatino)

04:36 am: uzairm47 notes
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jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.
‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

Wonderful art, sad message.

jtotheizzoe:

kateoplis:

Olafur Eiasson’s installation at MoMA, Your Waste of Time, consist of broken chunks of Iceland’s Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier. The museum had to turn one of their main galleries into a walk-in freezer to able to display them. “According to PS1, the pieces of ice chosen for the project are about 800 years old. That sounds about right to Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Scambos speculates that the ice came from the ‘Little Ice Age,’ the period between the 16th and 19th centuries during which glaciers grew larger than they ever have since—and advanced quickly.

‘These glaciers bear testimony to our history-being suspended and frozen for thousands of years-and now they are melting away, as if our whole history is fading,’ said Eliasson.”

Wonderful art, sad message.

04:34 am: uzairm1,526 notes
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Link
Time to wake up

Capitalism is predicated on standing on the backs of others to reach a higher point in your own life. This is what it has always depended on. Today, we live in a world more interwoven than ever before. Though you may live in Sweden or Australia or Monaco, and never actually see any slaves yourself, your world is dependent on them- from the shares you own in multi-billion dollar companies that depend on labor in the ‘south’ to the fine clothes you wear, carefully sequined together by 8-year old hands. 

With 1% of the world owning the rest of the 99% and with the gap between rich and poor growing ever starker, larger, and unforgiving, there is bound to be a point, when the seams start coming off the system- when the system is no longer sustainable. Is it a dot in time? A particular moment when we will say, yes, that was it- that was when the world woke up, or they woke up, or we realized we were wrong? 

Whatever the wake up catalyst or moment is, it is clear that there is no one moment/time for all of us. Some have already woken up, or started waking up - Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Syria, Turkey, and now Brazil. 

The question is, when will it take over the world? 

And will it happen as we expect it to- in a moment of clarity? Perhaps its an era, a movement/shift over days, nights, weeks, and months, perhaps it is the right tear gas canister hitting the wrong person, perhaps it is a protester lying dead on the ground, perhaps its your favorite street in your favorite city that makes you realize something has to change. Perhaps its you. Capitalism is pervasive- it seeps into our minds, bodies and souls. Our education systems feed it to us, our media forces us to swallow it, our parents buy into its version of success and failure, we dream of it- of cars, fancy dates, nice clothes, and posh mansions, we involuntary live it even if we don’t realize it. And while they/we dream of it, we practice it, in whatever small way we do, by standing on the back of another person-. 

Those people are waking up, folks. And they are mad. There is nothing we can do. The deed is done, the stone is cast, the damage irreversible. We can only join them in their anger- but for that we have to wake up too. 

01:08 pm: uzairm3 notes
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video

Here’s what’s going on in Syria and why America should not intervene

02:25 pm: uzairm5 notes
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video

appolsaucy:

good-idea-poorly-executed:

lostwiginity:

Interesting.

This is actually really interesting.

(via halleluyang)

11:10 am: uzairm76,004 notes
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video

Project Loon by Google

10:55 am: uzairm
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video

ucresearch:

Build your own Lego microscope


LegoScope is a DIY microscope made out of legos, lenses and a few custom-made pieces. The UCSF grad students behind the project spoke with Synapse about the ways in which LegoScope can demystify microscopy and science education:

How can LegoScope help students learn?

Reid Williams: It’s not what you’re teaching, but how are you teaching.  What’s really interesting for us, and what we’ve heard from teachers, is that there’s an advantage in a very hands-on, process-oriented fashion.  The underlying need that we’re working towards is learning something by putting together a tool rather than watching someone lecture.

If you are teaching the fifth to eighth grades, LegoScope can help incorporate a more intuitive feel for optics, or just for building and systems-thinking in general.  Students would take away more than microscopy and optics, but also the more intangible aspects, like an intuitive understanding of how light behaves.  It can be a very powerful exercise.  

Harrison Liu: A microscope is seen almost like a “black box,” yet we can take it apart and see how it works with LegoScope.  When you build something, then you can take ownership of it, you really learn it well.  You have to learn what each part does.  It’s different from normal teaching.  

(via scinerds)

01:08 am: uzairm516 notes
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photoset

buzzfeed:

Just a reminder that Maurice Sendak was incredible. He’s also today’s google doodle.

(Images via @LettersOfNote)

(via apsies)

01:00 am: uzairm2,548 notes
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12:55 am: uzairm9 notes
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Timeline of NSA Surveillance in the United States

A complete timeline of NSA surveillance in the United States

by the Electronic Frontier Foundation

12:32 am: uzairm
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video

Edward Snowden

NSA Whistleblower, hero, citizen, human. 

12:19 am: uzairm4 notes
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Talking Funny feat. Jerry Seinfeld, Ricky Jervais, Chris Rock and Louis C.K.

12:17 pm: uzairm4 notes
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Suddenly the internet is a dangerous place to hang out..

I don’t have anything to hide. I’m a normal guy: work, sleep, shenanigans, work and back to the cycle all over again. That’s me everyday. 

But I do like my privacy. I don’t like my niece’s pictures to be saved on a server somewhere just because I commented ‘boom’ on one of her pictures. I don’t like the government keep track of how many anti-drone status updates I made, neither how many times I post a quote by what would be considered a subversive figure, nor a phone call with my friend in Florida- both of us lighting up alarm bells because our last names are Mohammad. 

I don’t like people spying on me. I especially don’t like people spying on me when I have done nothing wrong, waiting for the slightest hint of submission before they warrant my records to pour through my digital life on the basis of some flimsy suspicion. 

What I don’t like at all is companies like Yahoo, Facebook, Google etc. that make money off my time spent on their sites, that advertise to me constantly, that inundate me with updates and features and all sorts of stuff to make me dumber by the day, sharing my electronic records with a third party. 

I don’t like that a foreign government, one that I have never paid a single  cent of taxes to, whose land I have barely ever stepped on, whose institutions I have never tangled with, and which I have never given any reason to cause concern, spies on me because it considers the rights of its citizens of higher value than mine. 

It is of no solace to me that America is spying on foreigners only. I am one of those foreigners, and I am pissed. 

I don’t like being spied on. I don’t like being tracked. I don’t like being told that its ok, when everything that I have been told since the time I was born states that its not ok.

Where is America’s respect for everyone else’s human rights? Perhaps if for the past 50 years America had kept out of everyone else’s business and not been an imperialist pain in the ass, perhaps then no one would be attaching it today, and perhaps then it would not have to adopt an even more pervasive form of imperialism by spying not on nations, or movements, or institutions, but average run-of-the-mill people- people like you and I. 

I don’t like waking up one morning to learn that for the past 4 years my rights have been violated day and night. And that this violation has occurred with the agreement of companies who I give business to.

Suddenly, the internet is a very dangerous place to hang out, not just for criminals, not just for child pornographers or those planning insidious acts of terror or otherwise, but also for normal people like you and I. I don’t like that either. 

11:54 pm: uzairm2 notes
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